Tag Archives: artist

Redbubble: Giving This Artist Community Another Look

Redbubble is not just another online place to showcase and sell your photography portfolio or your digital art, it is also a social media platform created by artists, for artists. I joined Redbubble in January 2011, uploaded a dozen photos, and then pretty much forgot about it. But in the three years since, I’ve managed to sell a couple of cards, a few prints, and just this week, a framed print. It was this most recent sale that got me motivated to take another look at Redbubble, update my profile, and upload more of my photographs.

redbubble-david-k-sutton

I now have nearly 40 photos uploaded to Redbubble, including 8 (as of writing) select street photography photos, the first time I’ve made any candids available for sale. Most of the fine art photos that I’ve uploaded to Redbubble can also be found for sale on my Smugmug page, although a few unique photos are available exclusively on Redbubble.

From this moment forward I plan to be more active within the Redbubble community, discovering works from other photographers, and getting some insight into their techniques and processes. I also plan to buy some artwork from other artists for my walls. In fact, I have a growing list of “favorites.”

What makes Redbubble special is the community of fellow photographers and artists. With my admittedly limited experience so far, Redbubble just seems more supportive of artists and their creative endeavors than other online galleries. It seems the enthusiasm and spunk so evident in how Redbubble is operated is infectious, attracting likeminded individuals to show their work, and participate and encourage others. But I will also be playing around with other online services. In addition to my longstanding Flickr page, I will be participating in the launch of Crated, and I just started building my profile page today after receiving my invite. Crated is a new online artist community that looks to compete with Redbubble. So stay tuned for more information about that.

Please check out my Redbubble profile, and if you are a photographer, give Redbubble a try.

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Gear Lust: It Matters Not What’s In Your Hands, But What’s In Your Head

When you find yourself in the throes of a major case of GAS (gear acquisition syndrome), you need to walk out of the store, or move your mouse cursor away from the Buy button. Next you need remind yourself that it is your imagination and creativity that most contributes to your passion, not the gear. What matters is not what’s in your hands, but what’s in your head.

I’m not saying you should never buy new gear, and in fact, I offer you a twist later in this article (more on that in a moment). What I’m saying is, don’t purchase gear with the belief that it will improve your work on the merits of the specifications alone. Think of all the iconic photographs from decades past, many of which are not superior on a technical level, even when they work exceptionally well on a compositional and emotional level. That new Nikon or Canon DSLR or that new zoom lens aren’t going to offer you any greater ability to tell a story with your photographs. The only thing that can do that is your imagination.

Here are some suggestions:

  • Slow down.
  • Don’t take a lot of photos, concentrate instead on what you are trying to accomplish.
  • Beyond the anchor or subject, pay attention to what is in the frame, especially at the edges.
  • Think about your composition and how different elements in the frame are flowing and interacting with each other.
  • Are you trying to tell a story with this shot, and will the composition offer a message to the viewer?

If you are overcome with the urge to buy a new piece of gear, instead look for inspiration by browsing the works of your favorite photographers, or better yet, discover new ones. And if that doesn’t quiet the desire for more hardware, pick up the gear you already own and go out and shoot! Because at the end of the day, taking more photos is how you improve your art, not buying new gear.

But if you still can’t resist that temptation, I offer this suggestion (here’s that twist I mentioned earlier): Head to eBay and get yourself a cheap film camera, like the 35mm Pentax K1000 that I just bought. But wait a second, I thought you said, “it’s not what’s in your hands, but what’s in your head.” — Yes, indeed I did, but I’m also realistic about gear lust. Sometimes you just need to buy something. But instead of the typical lens or camera body upgrade, take a hard left into uncharted territory and buy something you never thought you’d ever buy. For me, I never thought I’d go back to film. Hell, I never really shot much film in the first place. I think the last time I used a film camera I was in my teens in the early 1990s.

I want to reiterate that your imagination is the most important thing, but if gear is ever going to have any impact at all on the creative process, it’s likely to happen when you choose a piece of gear that really shakes things up, and makes you look at your craft in a different way. And in the case of old 35mm film cameras, it’s an inexpensive way to satisfy that hardware craving. Well, at least the gear is cheap. If you really get hooked, the film and developing costs could start to add up! Oh no, what have I done! 🙂

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